Visiting the Markets of Southeast Asia

In Southeast Asia, the daily market is like a garage sale + grocery store + auction house on too many cups of coffee.  From unusual meat items to untasted fruits, traditional fabrics and used flip flops; if you’re ready to barter and battle the crowds, you can find everything on your shopping list.

A few of my favorite market images:

Angry Bird sausages, Thailand

The region’s Angry Birds phase goes a bit(e) too far. Pai, Thailand.

 

Grubs and beetles, Thailand

“You must think we are crazy,” said the teenage Thai boy spooning grubs into his mouth. “But we like to eat bugs.” Mai Sai, Thailand.

 

Markets in Kalawy, Myanmar

The five-day rotating market around Shan State, between Kalaw and Inle Lake, brings vendors from many of the surrounding hill tribes and villages. Kalaw, Myanmar.  Photo courtesy of Hadyn Fitzpatrick.

Thanaka market, Myanmar

Thanaka– a paste made from trees- is used by Burmese women to enhance the complexion and protect against the sun. I get a beauty demonstration at a thanaka market. Shwebo, Myanmar.

 

Skinned rats, Cambodia

“I can not tell you what that is, it will scare the children,” our Cambodian chef whispered. The sight of skinned, bloody rats scared me, too. Battambang, Cambodia.

 

Fresh pork, Cambodia

Fresh pork for sale: another pleasant image for the weak-stomached. Battambang, Cambodia.

 

Rice, Philippines

The wide world of rice; steamed with chopped garlic, it’s served with every single meal. Siquijor, Philippines.

 

Moving market stall, Malaysia

In Malaysia, all you need is a motorbike and you can be a cook, taking your temporary kitchen anywhere. Kuala Besut, Malaysia.

 

Seafood market, Borneo

Today’s catch at the seafood market- special price for stingray. Kota Kinabalu, Borneo, Malaysia.

 

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3 responses to “Visiting the Markets of Southeast Asia

    • The same reason why norwegians eat putrefied shark meat, the Scottish eat haggis, the french eat frogs and fois gras, Italians and Spanish eat ham cured in salt peter, etc etc – because it tastes good.

    • The same reason why norwegians eat putrefied shark meat, the Scottish eat haggis, the french eat frogs and fois gras, Italians and Spanish eat ham cured in salt peter, etc etc – because it tastes good.

      In certain cases, this taste for exotic meat started out from the will to survive. For example, Cambodians in skun started eating fried spiders when there was nothing else to eat during the Khmer rouge period.

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